An Overview of the Mid-Year C2 Corvette Sting Ray: 1963-1967

Discover the Unique Features of the C2 Mid-Year Corvette: a Look at the Second Generation of America’s Iconic Sports Car from 1963-1967.

The C2 Chevrolet Corvette spans from 1963 to 1967. Here’s an overview of the second generation of Corvettes built during this time.
The C2 Chevrolet Corvette spans from 1963 to 1967. Here’s an overview of the second generation of Corvettes built during this time.

We are delving into the historical evolution of the C2 Mid-Year Corvette, examining the noteworthy changes that transpired over its five-year production span from 1963 to 1967. This overview provides insight into the second generation of Corvettes, showcasing their significance during this pivotal era in automotive history.

The muscle car holds a central role in the American automotive narrative, from the Beach Boys’ ode to the ‘giddy-up 409’ to Bruce Springsteen’s anthem to the ’69 Chevy boasting a 396 engine. Yet, among the pantheon of legendary muscle cars, none captivates the collective imagination quite like the Chevrolet Corvette.

What makes the C2 Corvette so unique? Read on to learn all about the iconic Corvette manufactured by General Motors from 1963 to 1967.

In This Article

C2 Mid-Year Corvette Production Years

The “C2 Mid-Year Corvette production years” encompass a crucial chapter in the Corvette’s storied history, spanning from 1963 to 1967. This five-year period witnessed the Corvette’s transformation from a stylish sports car to an enduring American automotive icon. With design innovations, performance enhancements, and a distinct Sting Ray aesthetic, the C2 Corvette solidified its position as a benchmark for automotive excellence. Over these years, General Motors introduced various model changes and options, making each year’s iteration unique and sought after by collectors. Understanding the nuances of these production years sheds light on the evolution and enduring appeal of this iconic vehicle.

1963 Chevrolet Sting Ray

One of the most important features in the C2s was the ZO6.  As we look at the C2 Corvette history, the 1963 C2 Corvette ZO6 is one of the most desirable vintage cars to collect and when you see the C2 ZO6 Corvette for Sale, it is going to demand a premium.
One of the most important features in the C2s was the ZO6. As we look at the C2 Corvette history, the 1963 C2 Corvette ZO6 is one of the most desirable vintage cars to collect, and when you see the C2 ZO6 Corvette for Sale, it is going to demand a premium.

The 1950s and 60s were the golden eras for the American automotive industry.

The economy was in the post-World War II boom. Folks who previously lived in urban centers moved to newly constructed suburbs. President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Federal-Aid Highway Act into law in 1956, and construction began on the Interstate Highway System.

It was this golden era that produced the Chevy Corvette. The first-generation Corvette rolled off the General Motors Assembly Line in 1953, and production continued until 1962.

The second-generation C2, known as the Sting Ray, was born from two different Chevy projects: the Q-Corvette and the Racing Stingray. Designers Pete Brock, Bill Mitchell, and Larry Shinoda worked on the C2 project, then XP-720. Their goal with this new model was to improve handling and increase passenger room.

Their design, known as the Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray, sent shockwaves across the automotive world. Today, its legacy is still felt as the most recent Stingray rolled off the factory floor in 2022.

Improvements From the C1

The C2 generation arrived in 1963 with several changes and improvements. The stated goal of the C2 designers was to improve both performance and style. Chevy also introduced the new Sting Ray Corvette as a coupe among the upgrades. The previous generation was only available as a convertible.

Exterior Design Changes

The C2 Sting Ray debuted with a narrow “fastback” design. This fastback also included a rear window panel design quirk: a dual-paned rear windshield. While the look of the dual panes turned heads, drivers found them to be a safety issue. They could not see while they were in reverse because of the split rear window.

The split window coupe was a one-year only.  Chevy took that feedback and introduced a single pane in 1964.

Included in the design were the quad headlights, hidden as folding lights. Vents on the hood were designed as functional but were made decorative due to high design costs. The coupe doors cut into the roof, making entering and exiting the low-to-the-ground car much more manageable.

C2 Mid-Year Corvette Convertibles

From 1963 to 1967, the mid-year C2 Corvette convertible was an option that was available throughout the entirety of its production period.
From 1963 to 1967, the mid-year C2 Corvette convertible was an option that was available throughout the entirety of its production period.

The iconic mid-year C2 Corvette convertible, available for model years 1963-1967, was offered throughout the entire production period of the C2 generation.

The 1963 through 1966 C2 Corvette convertible soft tops came in Black, White, and Beige but in 19367 the C2 Corvette convertible soft top was available in Black, White, or Teal Blue.

Interior Design Changes

A more prominent, rounded speedometer and tachometer were new to the C2 interior design.

The new Sting Ray also featured a roomier interior and a larger glovebox. Still, the lack of an external trunk meant that storage remained an issue, with the only storage space behind the two front seats.

Chassis Improvements

A shorter wheelbase and Ball-Race Steering improved the handling of the Sting Ray. A shorter wheelbase can inhibit handling in most cases, but the improved weight distribution negated the shorter wheelbase and improved handling. The rear wheels carried 80 more pounds to improve traction.

The C2 also featured cast-iron, 11-inch drum brakes like the C1. The C2s were wider, thus improving braking in tight situations.

Optional braking improvements included power-assist braking, sintered linings, and finned aluminum drums to improve brake cooling.

More Steel, Lighter Weight

The C2 featured twice the steel as the C1. This increased steel gave more body support and increased the strength and safety of the cockpit.

Yet the increased steel didn’t make the car heavier. Designers did not want to increase Sting Ray’s weight, so they decreased the thickness of the fiberglass body. Doing so made the Vette lighter than the C1.

1963 Engine Specifications

The 1963 Sting Ray came with a factory-issued 250 horsepower, 327 cubic-foot engine. The standard engine had a single 4-barrel carburetor, hydraulic valve lifters, and a dual exhaust system.

Three upgrades existed to the standard engine. Sports car enthusiasts could choose a 300, 340, or 360 horsepower engine.

300 Horsepower

The 300-horsepower model also came with a 327 cubic-foot engine. Its more oversized aluminum 4-barrel carburetor and larger intake valves differed.

340 and 360 Horsepower

These models have upgraded aluminum domed pistons. Their high-speed valve systems finish with specific exhaust valves.

These engines also have a five-quart oil capacity combined with mechanical valve lifters and an aluminum rocker. The 360-fuel injection engine comes with a larger aluminum manifold featuring better ram pipes and a tachometer warning buzzer.

Exhaust Systems

The exhaust systems on the 1963 Corvette pipes were either 2.0 inches or 2.5 inches. On the 1963-1965 Corvette, the exhaust manifolds came in either a 2.0 or 2.5-inch outlet size.

After 1965 all small block engines had 2.0 manifolds. The engines with the higher horsepower continued to have 2.5-inch pipes, and these had a smaller 2.0-inch connection to the manifold.

1963-1967 big-block engines had 2.5-inch manifolds and pipes. The mufflers were standard, or your coupe chose optional N11 off-road mufflers. N11 had one less baffle inside, which give it less restriction and created a more aggressive sound.

No matter what the pipe size or engine horsepower, the muffler outlets were always 2.0 inches.

The factory offered option N14, the side exhaust from 1965 through 1967. These had 2-inch or 2.5-inch inlet pipes with aluminum covers.

1963 Transmission Specs

The entire run of the C2 lasted only five years. Chevy only offered three different transmissions for the Sting Ray during that time.

  • Three-Speed manual
  • Four-Speed manual
  • Two-Speed Powerglide automatic

The standard transmission on the 1963 model was the 3-Speed Syncro-Mesh. But the three and four-speed share similarities. Both have a ten-inch semi-centrifugal clutch with an aluminum clutch housing.

1964 Sting Ray

One of the quirks of the 1963 model is the introduction of the “Sting Ray” line. Subsequent generations are “Stingray.”

The differences between the 1963 and 64 models are minimal. Designers eliminated the faux hood air vents. Designers also made the fake rear pillar vents functional on the ’64 model.

Horsepower remained the same, yet the 365 came with a new 4-barrel Holley carburetor rather than the 1963 Carter.

1965 Sting Ray

The ’65 featured a significant amount of tweaks, including the introduction of the 396 big-block V8 engine. This powerful engine clocked in at a whopping 425 horsepower.

Alongside the big-block V8, Chevy also provided a small-block V8 with 350 horsepower.

Another significant change to the ’65 was a brake system with four-wheel disc brakes.

1965 also came with a new-look front end with a wider grille. New front fender vents came fully functional, and the smooth hood was free of any indentations, with the Corvette logo a prominent feature.

1966 Sting Ray

The 1966 Mid-Year Corvette Sting Ray came with two big-block V8 options: 390 and 425 horsepower.

Chevy saw the demand for big-block engines the previous year. So they ramped up production of those engines while reducing the availability of the small-block 300 and 350-horsepower engines.

The exterior design of the ’66 featured significant changes. A new “egg crate” radiator grille had hidden hood vents. The headlights came with a black outer ring, and the rear end featured a fastback wrap-around rear window.

The Corvette logo moved to the hood corner.

1966 also came with a striking interior design. A new interior option was the four-way power seat. Headrests were also introduced to the interior for the first time.

1967 Sting Ray

1967 was the last year of the C2 line. Some believe it is the best of the line due to the five previous four years of innovation. They’re not wrong.

The ’67 came with minor but significant changes from the ’66. The standard engine of this Sting Ray was the 427 with Rochester 3×2 Tri-Force barrel carburetors. The factory engine also required a special 103-octane-rated fuel that was not widely available in the 1960s.

This Sting Ray was not meant for casual car enthusiasts but competitive racers looking for a mean machine.

Z06 Option

If the factory standards weren’t powerful enough, Chevy offered a specialized racing package for the C2 line called Z06.

The package included:

  • Vacuum brake boost
  • Larger front anti-roll bar
  • Stiffer springs and shock system
  • Dual Master Cylinder
  • 36.5-gallon gas tank
  • 5.4-liter 327 cubic-inch engine with 360 horsepower
  • Fuel injection

Starting in 1963, the Z06 only came with coupes due to their larger fuel tanks. Later on, the option became available for convertibles as Chevy removed the larger gas tank as a feature except for coupe models.

Interesting C2 Facts

The introduction of the C2 Sting Ray Corvette was a watershed moment in the American car industry. The launch represented a reflection of sports car culture in America and incredible innovations that’d impact high-performance vehicles in America and abroad.

Weight Distribution

Over half the 1963 Sting Ray weight rests on the rear axle. This weight distribution was a first for American front-engine cars and meant the Chevrolet C2 Corvette could handle turns better than any other American car.

Aggressive Sounds

GM introduced “off-road” exhaust for the C2. This off-road option wasn’t meant for mudding but rather a modified exhaust system with three baffles rather than five.

Fewer baffles increased the airflow, resulting in a louder and more aggressive sound muscle car drivers love.

Split Window

As stated previously, the first C2 coupe had a split rear window. GM discontinued the divided window for the rest of the C2 generation due to safety concerns.

The rarity of the 1963 Sting Ray split rear window makes it a coveted model among car collectors.

How many C2 Corvettes were produced?

  • 1963 – 21,513
  • 1964 – 22,229
  • 1965 – 23,564
  • 1966 – 27,720
  • 1967 – 22,940

The total production for the C2 Corvette was 117,966 models.

What were the base prices of the C2 Corvette?

Year Base Price

  • 1963 $4,037
  • 1964 $4,037
  • 1965 $4,106
  • 1966 $4,084
  • 1967 $4,240

What was the most expensive C2 Corvette sold to date (2023)?

The most expensive C2 Corvette sold to date (2023) is 1967 Chevy Corvette L88 Coupe, a C2, which sold at auction in 2014 for $3.85 million.

1967 Chevy Corvette L88 Coupe
1967 Chevy Corvette L88 Coupe

In 2014, a remarkable sale was made at auction, wherein a 1967 Chevy Corvette L88 Coupe sold for a staggering $3.85 million at the Barrett-Jackson’s Scottsdale Event. Such Corvettes, built on the much-admired C2 platform, were limited in production and lasted just three years; the 1967 models, particularly, were the rarest of them all with just 20 created. This rare L88 Corvette has impeccable documentation and unique color combinations. It was an exciting occasion considering that these 1967 Corvettes almost never come to market and will be talked about for a long time to come.

What is the rares C2 color?

Well, we have two answers to that question. First, the lowest color production C2 Corvette was the 1967 Tuxedo Black with only 815 that ordered that color. But another rare color was in 1964. The 1964 Corvette Satin Silver was used on the 64 Corvette and then never again.

Which C2 Corvette was the fastest?

Out of the relatively brief C2 generation, spanning from 1963 to 1967, the fastest Corvette to ever come off the factory line was the 1967 Corvette L88 Sting Ray with its incredible quarter-mile time of 11.02 seconds.

Custom C2 Corvette

During the automobile industry’s heyday, customizing a C2 Corvette was all the rage among car enthusiasts. To gain a better understanding of the fascinating history behind the C2 Corvette, check out our article: C2 Corvette Body Kits Revolution in Customizing.

C2 Corvette Photos

1963 Ermine White Corvette Coupe
1963 Ermine White Corvette Coupe
1967 Marlboro Maroon Corvette Convertible
1967 Marlboro Maroon Corvette Convertible
1965 Rally Red Corvette Coupe
1965 Rally Red Corvette Coupe
1965 Rally Red Corvette Coupe
1965 Rally Red Corvette Coupe
1965 Rally Red Corvette Coupe
1965 Rally Red Corvette CoupeCorvette Coupe
1966 Tuxedo Black Corvette Coupe
1966 Tuxedo Black Corvette Coupe
1966 Tuxedo Black Corvette Coupe
1966 Tuxedo Black Corvette Coupe
1966 Tuxedo Black Corvette Coupe
1966 Tuxedo Black Corvette Coupe
1967 Goodwood Green Corvette Convertible
1967 Goodwood Green Corvette Convertible
1967 Goodwood Green Corvette Convertible
1967 Goodwood Green Corvette Convertible
1967 Marlboro Maroon Corvette Convertible
1967 Marlboro Maroon Corvette Convertible
1967 Marlboro Maroon Corvette Convertible
1967 Marlboro Maroon Corvette Convertible
1966 Mosport Green Corvette Coupe
1966 Mosport Green Corvette Coupe
1966 Mosport Green Corvette Coupe
1966 Mosport Green Corvette Coupe
1963 Silver Blue Corvette
1963 Silver Blue Corvette
1963 Silver Blue Corvette
1963 Silver Blue Corvette
1963 Silver Blue Corvette
1963 Silver Blue Corvette

C2 Corvette Race Cars

The original C1s had not quite reached their peak performance level, designers/engineers Zora Arkus-Duntov and Bill Mitchell aimed to solve this problem by experimenting with various prototypes at the end of the C1 production run.

However, this endeavor was thwarted by the Automotive Manufacturers Association’s ban on allowing production cars to partake in racing events.

Despite this, Duntov and Mitchell, as well as other GM employees, still managed to devote their free time to developing early Corvette racecars.

Here is the most expensive (sold) C2 Corvette race car. It is the 1969 Corvette Factory L88 Rebel #57 which sold for $2,860,000 at the Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale auction in 2014.

1969 Corvette Factory L88 Rebel #57
1969 Corvette Factory L88 Rebel #57

This 1969 Corvette Factory L88 Rebel #57 C3-based car is something of a legendary machine. Although its color scheme may not be popular, the ‘Rebel’ L88 has won both Daytona and Sebring and an IMSA championship – so it’s understandable why it brought a much higher price than one would expect for an “ordinary” 1969 L88.

Kevin Mackay of Corvette Repair was responsible for its complete restoration. Of all the L88s, the ’67 Corvettes are the most rare, yet the ’69 version was produced in larger numbers at 116, yet it remains one of the most celebrated Corvettes in history.

One of 14 early-production 1963 Corvette Z06s assigned to top road-racers by Chevrolet. This Gulf One has been restored and preserved to race-ready condition. Photo Credit: Mecum Auction
One of 14 early-production 1963 Corvette Z06s assigned to top road-racers by Chevrolet. This Gulf One has been restored and preserved to race-ready condition. Photo Credit: Mecum Auction

Another unique Corvette Race Car went to auction in 2022. This 1963 Corvette ZO6 Gulf One with the 327/360 engine headed to the Mecum Kissimmee auction. The 1963 Corvette ZO6 Gulf One bid to $2,400,000 – The Bid Goes On. You can read about it in this blog post.

C2 Corvette Timeline and Historical Milestones Summary

  • 1963: Introduction of the Sting Ray: The C2 Corvette debuts with the Sting Ray nameplate, featuring a revolutionary new design.
  • 1963: Introduction of the Corvette Coupe: The first-ever Corvette Coupe, with its distinctive split rear window, becomes available.
  • 1965: 427 Big-Block Engine: The iconic 427-cubic-inch V8 engine is introduced, offering incredible power and performance.
  • 1967: Dominance in Motorsport: The Corvette establishes itself as a dominant force in motorsport, with notable victories at the 24 Hours of Le Mans and other prestigious races.
  • 1967: Last Year of C2 Production: The C2 generation comes to a close in 1967, concluding a period of innovation and excellence in Corvette history.

These milestones in the C2 Corvette’s timeline highlight its transformation, technological advancements, and racing success during its production years from 1963 to 1967.

The “C2 Corvette collector’s market trends” unveil a captivating story of enduring passion and appreciation for these classic American sports cars. C2 Corvettes have consistently held a strong position in the collector’s market due to their iconic design and historical significance, with the market for these vintage vehicles showing steady growth. Well-maintained and original examples have become increasingly sought after by enthusiasts and collectors alike. If you’re interested in exploring the current market trends and finding C2 Corvettes for sale, you can browse our website’s Corvettes for Sale Classified Ads section. Here, you’ll discover a curated selection of C2 Corvettes, providing an opportunity to own a piece of automotive history or add to your existing collection. Additionally, for in-depth insights into recent auction prices and market dynamics, explore our Corvette Auction Results blog post categories, offering valuable information to help you navigate the competitive landscape of these cherished vehicles. Whether you’re a seasoned collector or a passionate enthusiast, our resources are designed to keep you well-informed about the C2 Corvette market.

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You can read more about Corvette’s History by generation. Check out these Corvette overviews:

You can also find out information about specific C2 model years: 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, and 1967 on our blog in their specific category.

Delve into the captivating history of Corvette paint colors and uncover the intriguing stories behind these iconic hues, from their origins in high-performance racing to their prominence during the muscle car era. Join us on this historical journey by visiting this article for more on Corvette Paint Color Names History.

When it comes to classic cars, few are as iconic as the mid-year Corvettes, often referred to as the C2 generation (1963-1967). These remarkable automobiles embody a golden era in American automotive design and engineering. Explore our article on mid-year Corvette side louver differences to help identify specific model years.

Explore the captivating story of this rare 1966 Big Tank Corvette with the potent 427 engine, which commanded a remarkable $275,000 at the Mecum Glendale auction in March 2023. Discover what sets this Corvette apart and makes it an extraordinary piece of automotive history. The $275,000 1966 Big Tank 427 Corvette

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